Mandalay Bay Exodus

I recognize now that, although,  I was terrified that I was never actually in danger.   Also,  I recognize that unlike the 58 victims of the shooting at concert at Mandalay Bay, I  went home to my family.  With these feelings comes a sense of guilt for struggling to really process the evening.

Sunday night was the kick-off dinner for the NetApp A-Team at NetApp Insight.   About 40 of us, dined and chatted in a private room at Libertine Social, connected to Mandalay Bay.  A couple of people, though, had left early to go back to their room.   Most of us have had a few drinks and the mood is pretty upbeat.  We are all excited to kickoff the NetApp Insight conference that is scheduled to begin on Monday.   

At about 10:15 p.m., a waitress enters the room and alerts us to a security issue within the casino.  We are instructed to stay exactly where we are.   One of A-Team guys receives a text from a friend stating that there is an active shooter at Mandalay Bay.    Ten minutes pass and the door to the private room opens again.  This time,  we are basically told to leave as quickly as possible. 

Upon leaving the private room, we see SWAT teams running in the opposite direction that we were told to go.   At this point, we are fleeing through the casino and back towards the Convention Center. 

Initially, we are told to head to the Shark Reef.  Heading into the Shark Reef seems like questionable advice at the time.  It looks dark and scary.  Is there even an exit there?  Later, I learn that there is an exit that is part of the evacuation plan that the staff at Mandalay Bay practice regularly. 

Instead, I’m relieved when we are instructed to head outside through a bunch of double doors instead of the Shark Reef.   My relief is pretty short term once I pass through the doors.  The area is walk down stairs flanked by buildings, and a parking garage.  It’s not very open, You have no clue who will be on the other side of the doors when they open. 

Multiple times, I say to one of the A-Team guys that this is not a good idea and we should not be waiting here.  He agrees, but we all just stay put.  We stay put until a helicopter starts circling overhead and broadcasts that we all need to leave the area and to flee.

We make it out to Las Vegas Boulevard. Police instruct us to head back behind the police cars at the “Welcome to Las Vegas” sign.  We aren’t near the Las Vegas sign very long until we are told again by police to run.  During this time, we keep seeing police cars racing towards Mandalay Bay. 

We continued to be pushed away from the Strip multiple times by the police.  Eventually, we end up at Jack in the Box and then Sunset Blvd in the parking lot of the Lazy Dog.  Lazy Dog is about 1.5 miles from Mandalay Bay.   At these parking lots, fake news starts filtering in about shooting at other casinos. 

One of the A-Team guys has an Aunt that lives in Henderson and he says that he’s going to Uber there.  He says that he can take a couple of people with him.  Both me and another woman from NetApp’s Sunnyvale office take him up on the offer.  Honestly, I’m beyond grateful for the chance to get out of Las Vegas that night.   I’m also grateful to the A-Teamer’s that reassured me that everything was going to be okay during the emotional trek.   

When we walk through the doors at his aunt’s house, I feel an instant sense of relief.  I feel safe for the first time since we started our exodus out of Mandalay Bay.   Maybe this wasn’t the night that I was going to die after all. 

Billboard in Mandalay Bay

 

Highlights from My First VMworld

VMworld logo in exhibition hall

On Monday, September 4th, I did my first podcast interview.  The podcast was the Tech Interviews with Paul Stringfellow, a fellow NetApp A-Teamer.  If you never had the pleasure of listening to Paul’s podcast or met him firsthand, you may not know that he is one charming guy.  Seriously, he’s “Hugh Grant” charming.   

The topic of my podcast interview was “Thoughts on VMworld 2017”.  Pre-interview, I went through and captured some of my topics that I wanted to touch on about my experience at VMworld.   I’m pretty introverted, so I thought that prepping some would help me to feel less awkward.  Because it was my first time on a podcast, I’ll cut myself some slack and tell that negative voice in my head to “hush”.   

Paul usually interviews seasoned IT professionals and experienced podcast guests.  This time he was interviewing me, a total podcast and VMworld attendee newbie.  I’ve been trying pretty hard to get out of my comfort zone and become more involved in the Tech Community.  Paul’s podcast was the the perfect opportunity to meet both of those objectives. 

Here are some additional thoughts that I had about VMworld that I failed to express:

Happy for Homework

One of the best things about attending a conference is leaving with a slew of topics that don’t know that much about and can’t wait to learn more about.  It way too easy to stay in your own little tech bubble.   OpenStack, NFV, SolidFire, coding with APIs are at the top of my homework list. 

HCI and Software Defined Storage Will Reign Supreme

VMworld had lots of HCI and Software Defined Storage talk.  That is not surprising.  However, during a Software Defined session that I attended, they predicted that 50% of existing storage will be software defined storage; 30% will be hyper-converged by 2019.  Wow!   

Tech Field Day for the World!

I had the incredible opportunity to be a delegate at Stephen Foskett’s Tech Field Day Extra at VMworld.  Stephen is the Kevin Bacon of the Tech World.  He knows everybody!  It was an incredible honor to be surrounded by some serious Tech Community Rockstars.  I also had the good fortune of seeing Samsung, Druva, and NetApp’s presentations in real-time with the opportunity to ask any questions.. 

Overall, VMworld was an amazing experience for me.  I had many opportunities to get out of my comfort zone.   Post-VMworld, my next step is to start building a business case for why I should attend again next year.  You can find more about VMworld experience, by checking out my Google photo album.

Link to my VMworld 2017 photo album.

 

First Timer’s Guide to NetApp Insight

While NetApp Insight is great for tech veterans, it’s also perfect for a conference newbie. The tech community is a very welcoming! At 4,000+ attendees, the turnout is pretty big, without being overwhelming. Even though there is a second Insight conference in EMEA about a month later, there is still a pretty hefty global turnout. Having just gone to Insight for the first time last year, I wanted to share a couple of pro tips to help Insight frosh improve their experience and get the most out of the conference.     

Download the Insight App 

About a month before the event, look for the Insight App for iOS and Android. I don’t know about you, but I get lost pretty easily at these big tradeshows. This app kept my session schedule close at hand with helpful maps to get me to the right place at the right time. 

Listen to the Tech ONTAP podcast episodes on Insight.  

If you aren’t already listening to the Tech ONTAP (ToT) podcast on the regular, now is the time to start. Last year, the ToT crew recorded a slew of Insight-inspired episodes for before, during, and after the conference. The preview podcast episode was great prep for me as an Insight first-timer last year. 

Recognize the badge colors

When you check in to Insight, you’ll have a badge printed out for you. Each badge is color-coded to indicate the following:

It’s a great way to meet people and it helps you when you’re socializing to instantly know people’s backgrounds and roles.

Eat lunch in the dining hall

For breakfast, you can grab some coffee and a breakfast sandwich to go. But also make sure you find some time to visit the dining hall for a buffet. It’s a great opportunity to network and make new friends. 

Make time for sessions—and more!

The best sessions at Insight usually book up early. You can save your space by registering for sessions prior to Insight. You can find the Schedule Builder online now.   

And while the sessions are top-notch at Insight, there’s lots more to see and do:

  • Explore the convention floor (and collect swag!).
  • Stop by the Developers’ Café. Check out a vBrownBag. 
  • Visit the hands-on lab.

Don’t fret if you miss a session, because you’ll be able to view the sessions online in about 6 weeks.

Get certified  

At the conference, you’ll find a popup Pearson Vue testing center. Think about how much your boss would love it if you came back with a new certification! At Insight, all NetApp certification tests are offered free of charge. If you fail, you can try again (as long as it is in accordance with NetApp’s standard re-take policy). You can prepare for the test by completing NetApp University’s free training. Also, each certification has an outline of the documents referenced in the test creation. The reference documents are an awesome source of study material. As long as you have a valid NetApp support account, you should be able to access all of the study materials and training at no cost.

A practical tip: bring your own water (BYOW)

I’m a really big drinker…of water…so this is a big deal to me. Mandalay Bay has many places to buy bottled water. Unfortunately, the price of a bottle of water appears to be fixed at an artificially high rate. I don’t know about you, but I would prefer not to pay 10% of my per diem on one 1L bottle of water.

While sessions are going on, you can grab a cup of water at the back. You may also find some bottles of water on the conference floor, too. However, for your long-term hydration needs, you probably will want to venture up the strip to the nearby CVS inside New York, New York for some cheap water bottles. CVS is also a great place to pick up some not-so-expensive souvenirs (like T-shirts) for the kids! 

These are just a few of my tips to make your first Insight experience a little better. Regardless of whether you take my advice, you are sure to have a great time—have fun!

Holy Ham Sandwich! NetApp Hybrid Cloud is Real!

a-teamFirst things first, I’m awed by the depth of the technical expertise of the NetApp A-Team advocates and advisors. I’m incredibly honored and grateful for the opportunity to join the family. It’s a NetApp fan-girl’s dream come true! #womenintech. Being part of the NetApp A-Team comes with perks like pre-release access to announcements and briefings directly from NetApp’s own executives and experts. As if this weren’t awesome enough, we also have opportunities to engage in interactive conversations with these experts.

Recently, I participated in one of those conversations, my first NetApp A-Team briefing: “Hybrid Cloud Delivered by NetApp” with Ingo Fuchs. It was a continuation of NetApp’s Data Fabric vision/hybrid cloud message that we heard at NetApp Insight 2016. Here are the 2 two key takeaways that I got out of this briefing.

cloud_sync

  1. Data Fabric subscription-based cloud services have arrived. Although NetApp has already given customers access to the Amazon cloud with EMR for analytics, with the new Cloud Sync Service, you can now use Amazon’s resources for analytics of on-premises NFS data. This model lets customers spin up additional resources as needed and it reduces the analytics processing time from hours to minutes. Another new service, Cloud Control for MS Office 365, enables backup to on-premises data center targets (FAS, ONTAP Cloud, StorageGRID, AltaVault).sgrid_rev
  2. StorageGRID 10.3 is revolutionizing NetApp object storage. This latest release of SGRID is a big deal, and here are some of the highlights. It’s now integrated and distributed by NetApp with no OS installation, and you can deploy using OVF (VMware) or YAML (OpenStack). SGRID’s new built-in Policy Simulator Tool allows you to simulate policy changes to help prevent any costly or disruptive mistakes. During S3 performance tests, the PUT (writes), and GET (reads), object rate per node was 2-4 times faster than 10.2 (released about 6 months ago). And with the increased functionality of an improved GUI, you can complete tasks like decommissioning an entire data center. Pretty incredible, if you ask me.

While these two features might may not be top of the bill with in this week’s hybrid cloud launch, they’re what gets me excited about the future of NetApp. I would encourage everyone to look into what NetApp is doing around hybrid cloud today. There’s a lot to love, and if this launch is any indication, there’s a lot more coming in the future. Stay tuned.

Craniosynostosis is a birth defect that affects 1 in 2000 babies

Types of Craniosynostis
Types of Craniosynostis

Craniosynostosis Awareness is a passion of mind because my son was born with this. Craniosynostosis is a birth defect that affects 1 in 2000 babies. Fortunately, our pediatrician knew enough about cranio to send us to a neurosurgeon. Blake was officially diagnosed with craniosynostosis with trigoncephaly at about 3 months old. Many families aren’t so lucky.

Anyhow, because Blake’s metopic (forehead) suture was prematurely closed and his head couldn’t grow normally, his head had a triangular shape. Apart from the stigma of an odd-shaped head, craniosynostosis can potentially cause brain damage in severe cases.

Because of this, we elected for Blake to have surgery.   See his journey in photos.   Learn more about  craniosynostosis on http://www.craniokids.org